Between Dissolution and Blood: How Administrative Lines and Categories Shape Secessionist Outcomes

@article{Griffiths2015BetweenDA,
  title={Between Dissolution and Blood: How Administrative Lines and Categories Shape Secessionist Outcomes},
  author={Ryan D. Griffiths},
  journal={International Organization},
  year={2015},
  volume={69},
  pages={731 - 751}
}
Abstract Common wisdom and current scholarship hold that governments need to stand firm in the face of secessionist demands, since permitting the secession of one region can set a precedent for others. For this reason governments will often choose blood rather than risk dissolution. I argue that administrative organization provides states with a third option. Those regions that represent a unique administrative type stand a much better chance of seceding peacefully. Moreover, large articulated… Expand
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