Beta‐carotene supplementation and cancer risk: a systematic review and metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials

@article{DruesnePecollo2010BetacaroteneSA,
  title={Beta‐carotene supplementation and cancer risk: a systematic review and metaanalysis of randomized controlled trials},
  author={Nathalie Druesne-Pecollo and Paule Latino-Martel and Teresa Norat and Emilie Barrandon and Sandrine Bertrais and Pilar Galan and Serge Hercberg},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2010},
  volume={127}
}
The effect of beta‐carotene supplementation on cancer incidence has been investigated in several randomized controlled trials. The objective was to review the effect of beta‐carotene supplementation on cancer incidence in randomized trials by cancer site, beta‐carotene supplementation characteristics and study population. Relevant trials were retrieved by searching PubMed (up to April 2009). Authors involved in selected studies were contacted for additional information. Thirteen publications… 
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TLDR
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  • Medicine
    Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
  • 2016
TLDR
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TLDR
The evidence from the included studies confirms that there is an association between β-carotenoids and breast cancer risk; the dietary intake of β- carotenoid may be beneficial in reducing the risk of developing breast cancer.
Effect of Carotene and Lycopene on the Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
Background Many epidemiologic studies have investigated the association between carotenoids intake and risk of Prostate cancer (PCa). However, results have been inconclusive. Methods We conducted a
Carotenoid intake from natural sources and colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies
TLDR
Overall, the findings do not support a significant association between intake of specific carotenoids from dietary sources, as well as combined carOTenoids, and the risk of CRC overall and by anatomic subsite.
Drugs for preventing lung cancer in healthy people.
TLDR
Whether vitamins and minerals and other potential agents, alone or in combination, reduce lung cancer incidence and lung cancer mortality in healthy populations and in smokers or asbestos workers is investigated.
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TLDR
There was no benefit or harm from beta-carotene supplementation for a limited period on the incidence of cancer and of cardiovascular disease among apparently healthy women.
Beta-carotene supplementation and incidence of cancer and cardiovascular disease: the Women's Health Study.
TLDR
Among apparently healthy women, there was no benefit or harm from beta-carotene supplementation for a limited period on the incidence of cancer and of cardiovascular disease.
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BACKGROUND Observational studies suggested that a diet high in fruits and vegetables, both of which are rich with antioxidants, may prevent cancer development. However, findings from randomized
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TLDR
The PHS found no overall effect of beta-carotene on total cancer, or the three most common site-specific cancers, and the possibility of risk reduction within specific subgroups remains.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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