Beringian Standstill and Spread of Native American Founders

@article{Tamm2007BeringianSA,
  title={Beringian Standstill and Spread of Native American Founders},
  author={Erika Tamm and Toomas Kivisild and Maere Reidla and Mait Metspalu and David George Smith and Connie J. Mulligan and Claudio M Bravi and Olga Rickards and Cristina Mart{\'i}nez-Labarga and Elsa K. Khusnutdinova and Sardana A. Fedorova and M. V. Golubenko and Vadim A. Stepanov and Marija Gubina and Sergey I. Zhadanov and Ludmila P. Ossipova and Larisa Damba and Mikhail Ivanovich Voevoda and Jos{\'e} Edgardo Dipierri and Richard Villems and Ripan Singh Malhi},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2007},
  volume={2}
}
Native Americans derive from a small number of Asian founders who likely arrived to the Americas via Beringia. However, additional details about the intial colonization of the Americas remain unclear. To investigate the pioneering phase in the Americas we analyzed a total of 623 complete mtDNAs from the Americas and Asia, including 20 new complete mtDNAs from the Americas and seven from Asia. This sequence data was used to direct high-resolution genotyping from 20 American and 26 Asian… Expand
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