Bergmann's and Allen's Rules in Native European and Mediterranean Phasmatodea

@article{Shelomi2017BergmannsAA,
  title={Bergmann's and Allen's Rules in Native European and Mediterranean Phasmatodea},
  author={Matan Shelomi and Dirk Zeuss},
  journal={Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution},
  year={2017},
  volume={5}
}
Bergmann’s rule states that organisms at higher latitudes should be larger and thicker than those closer to the equator to better conserve heat, and Allen’s rule states that they will have shorter and thicker limbs at higher latitudes. Alternative explanations for latitudinal size clines include plant productivity and seasonality. The rules generally hold in endotherms, but in insects different species within the same genus can respond to latitude in unpredictable ways. We present the first… 

Figures and Tables from this paper

Geographical clines in the size of the herb field mouse (Apodemus uralensis).
TLDR
The herb field mouse was found to be characterized by high size variability, with the largest individuals inhabiting the eastern and southern edges of the distribution range, in agreement with Allen's rule.
So different but nonetheless the same species: multiple geographic clines explain the diverse forms of the anthidiine bee Rhodanthidium caturigense s.l. (Apoidea: Megachilidae: Anthidiini)
TLDR
Rhodanthidium caturigense turns out to be a species with high phenotypic plasticity and apparently a high epigenetic capacity to adapt to certain environmental conditions, not based on genotypic selection mechanisms.
Tooth Size Variation in Assemblages of Tremacyllus (Hegetotheriidae, Notoungulata): Insights into Geographical Gradients, Systematics, and Sexual Dimorphism
  • M. A. Armella
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    Journal of Mammalian Evolution
  • 2021
TLDR
Analysis of tooth size variations within assemblages of Tremacyllus indicates that patterns of variation might be associated with eruption time and/or functional position, and two size subgroups might reflect sexual dimorphism in the absence of biostratigraphic or morphological differences between them.
Natural and sexual selection drive multivariate phenotypic divergence along climatic gradients in an invasive fish
TLDR
This study is the first to investigate phenotypic divergence in multiple traits, including sexually selected traits (size and shape of the male copulatory organ, the gonopodium) of invasive Gambusia affinis in China, and finds phenotypesic variation along climatic gradients to be strongest in naturally selected traits.
Habitat productivity is a poor predictor of body size in rodents
TLDR
The results do not support the view that resource availability plays a major role in explaining geographic variation in rodent body size, and the best fit GLS model detected no significant association between body mass and NDVI across assemblages.
Mobility costs and energy uptake mediate the effects of morphological traits on species' distribution and abundance.
TLDR
The results indicate that differences in the energy allocations strategies of species account for a considerable part of the variation in species' distribution and abundance that is left unexplained by morphological traits alone and ignoring these differences can lead to false mechanistic conclusions.
Climate change‐driven body size shrinking in a social wasp
TLDR
It remains uncertain how small ectotherms, such as insects, respond to increased temperature, but climate change is expected to produce shifts in species distributions as well as behavioural, life‐history, and/or morphological adaptations to find suitable conditions or cope with the altered environment.
The roles of phenotypic plasticity and adaptation in morphology and performance of an invasive species in a novel environment
TLDR
The spotted‐wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, has rapidly invaded divergent environments providing the opportunity to examine adaptive and maladaptive phenotypic and evolutionary responses to its introduced range.
Short Stature: Understanding the Stature of Ethnicity in Height Determination
TLDR
This review covers in detail the short stature of African Pygmies and Andamanese Islanders along with the possible causative factors responsible for the variation in height in these ethnic groups.
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 55 REFERENCES
Where Are We Now? Bergmann’s Rule Sensu Lato in Insects
  • M. Shelomi
  • Environmental Science
    The American Naturalist
  • 2012
TLDR
It is concluded that studies of Bergmann’s rule should focus within species and look at widespread but contiguous populations to account for all sources of variation while minimizing error.
What determines conformity to Bergmann's rule?
TLDR
It is suggested that species with large geographical ranges are likely to encounter significant heterogeneity in those factors that influence body size, and are thus likely to exhibit size clines, and that the spatial distribution of key resources within the species range constitutes a significant predictor of carnivore body size.
Latitudinal patterns in the size of European butterflies
The importance of seasonality in shaping latitudinal size patterns was investigated in 16 species of lycaenine and satyrine butterflies with distributions in Sweden and continental Europe. Species
ECTOTHERMS FOLLOW THE CONVERSE TO BERGMANN'S RULE
  • Timothy A Mousseau
  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1997
TLDR
Strong empirical evidence is presented that refutes the applicability of Bergmann's Rule paradigm, and in fact points to a converse of Bergman's Rule for ectotherms, as has been suggested by Masaki and others.
Allen’s rule revisited: quantitative genetics of extremity length in the common frog along a latitudinal gradient
TLDR
In the wild, the body size–corrected femur and tibia lengths did not conform to Allen’s rule but peaked at mid‐latitudes, however, the ratio of femur to tibia length increased in the north, and the common garden data revealed a genetic cline consistent with Allen's rule in some trait and treatment combinations.
Geographic gradients in body size: a clarification of Bergmann's rule
1997 marked the sesquicentenary of the publication by Carl Bergmann of the observation that, in general, large‐bodied animal species tend to live further north than their small‐bodied relatives. This
CLIMATIC ADAPTATION AND PHOTOPERIODIC RESPONSE IN THE BAND‐LEGGED GROUND CRICKET
  • Sinzo Masaki
  • Environmental Science
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1972
TLDR
The duration of nymphal development would be selected by the length of the growing season, since adult size is closely correlated with development time, and this selection would set the upper limit for adult size.
Bergmann's rule; a concept cluster?
TLDR
A review of the literature on Bergmann's rule is conducted, and it is suggested that Bergman's original rule be maintained (a direct translation is provided), and mechanism is inherent in Bergmann’s rule and is required for a rule to be of scientific value.
Revision of the Iberian stick insect genus Leptynia Pantel and description of the new genus Pijnackeria
TLDR
Morphological, karyological and molecular investigations concordantly revealed that considerable differences exist between the two complexes, each representing a monophyletic group, and a splitting of the genus Leptynia is felt necessary.
Environmental drivers of voltinism and body size in insect assemblages across Europe
TLDR
The first analyses of voltinism and body size of insect assemblages at a continental scale using lepidopteran and odonate species are presented, supporting the idea that body sizes of terrestrial and aquatic insects form contrasting geographical patterns because they are differently affected by temperature and resource constraints.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...