Bergmann’s Rule and Body Size in Mammals

@article{Freckleton2003BergmannsRA,
  title={Bergmann’s Rule and Body Size in Mammals},
  author={Robert P. Freckleton and Paul H. Harvey and Mark Pagel},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2003},
  volume={161},
  pages={821 - 825}
}
Aim: To describe the geographical pattern of mean body size of the non-volant mammals of the Nearctic and Neotropics and evaluate the influence of five environmental variables that are likely to affect body size gradients. Location: The Western Hemisphere. Methods: We calculated mean body size (average log mass) values in 110 × 110 km cells covering the continental Nearctic and Neotropics. We also generated cell averages for mean annual temperature, range in elevation, their interaction… 
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