Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: 10‐Year Experience in Treating 592 Patients with Canalith Repositioning Procedure

@article{Prokopakis2005BenignPP,
  title={Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: 10‐Year Experience in Treating 592 Patients with Canalith Repositioning Procedure},
  author={Emmanuel Prokopakis and Theognosia Chimona and Minas Tsagournisakis and Panagiotis N Christodoulou and Barry E. Hirsch and Vassilios A. Lachanas and Emmanuel S. Helidonis and Andreas Plaitakis and George A Velegrakis},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={2005},
  volume={115}
}
Objective: To assess the long‐term efficacy of canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) in the treatment of patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). 
Contralateral Incipient Posterior Canal Benign Positional Paroxysmal Vertigo: Complication After Epley Maneuver
TLDR
Particle repositioning procedures give consistent results for the treatment of benign positional paroxysmal vertigo, but little consideration has been given to the possibilities of bilateral disease.
Use of Vestibular Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
TLDR
The different test procedures for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) are described and guidance for the treatment of the various symptoms is provided.
Practice Parameter: Therapies for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (an evidence-based review): Report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of NeurologySYMBOLSYMBOLSYMBOL
GLOSSARYAAN = American Academy of Neurology; BPPV = benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; CONSORT = Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials; CRP = canalith repositioning procedure; NNT = number
Effectiveness of the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP, or Epley maneuver) in treating adults with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV)
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Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: diagnosis and treatment.
TLDR
Treatment is based on the identification of the affected semicircular canal and performance of liberatory maneuvers or repositioning of free floating particles of otoliths, which varies from 70 to 100%.
In whom does horizontal canal BPPV recur?
PURPOSE The objective of this study is to examine the rate of horizontal canal BPPV recurrence of the same type and search for predisposing factors.
Canalith Repositioning Procedures among 965 Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
TLDR
This study provides class IV evidence that CRP remains an efficient and long-lasting noninvasive treatment for BPPV, especially for younger patients without a history of head trauma or vestibular neuropathy.
Epley’s maneuver versus Semont’s maneuver in treatment of posterior canal benign positional paroxysmal vertigo
TLDR
Both Epley's and Semont’s maneuver are equally effective for treating the patients of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
Bilateral Multicanal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Coexisting with a Vestibular Schwannoma: Case Report
TLDR
This case serves as a reminder of the importance of differentiating between central and peripheral vestibular disorders, as well as central and anterior canal BPPV-induced down-beating nystagmus in order to establish the correct diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment.
Efficacy of canalith repositioning maneuvers for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo
TLDR
The results indicate that BPPV can be diagnosed easily and treated using a simple maneuver, and it seems to be unnecessary to perform other diagnostic examinations routinely before trying CRM.
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References

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TLDR
Sixty-six patients with the symptoms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were treated by challenging them with the precipitating head positions on a repeated and serial basis and one patient whose condition did not respond was found to have a perilymphatic fistula that mimicked BPPV.
The Canalith Repositioning Procedure: For Treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
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TLDR
The results of the Canalith Repositioning Procedure support an alternative theory that the densities that impart gravity-sensitivity to a semicircular canal in BPPV are free in the canal, rather than attached to the cupula.
Particle repositioning maneuver for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo
TLDR
The particle repositioning maneuver (PRM) relocates the free‐floating particles from the posterior semicircular canal back into the utricle, relieving the patient of bothersome, often long‐standing vertigo.
Short- and long-term outcomes of canalith repositioning for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo
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  • Medicine
    Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
  • 2000
TLDR
This is a prospective, nonrandomized study of the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and application of recurrence data to a Kaplan-Meier estimation suggests a 15% Recurrence rate per year of BPPV, with a 50% recurrence rate of B PPV at 40 months after treatment.
Short- and Long-Term Outcomes of Canalith Repositioning for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
TLDR
This is a prospective, nonrandomized study of the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and application of recurrence data to a Kaplan-Meier estimation suggests a 15% Recurrence rate per year of BPPV, with a 50% recurrence rate of B PPV at 40 months after treatment.
Migrainous vertigo presenting as episodic positional vertigo
TLDR
The following factors help to distinguish migrainous positional vertigo from BPPV: short-duration symptomatic episodes and frequent recurrences, manifestation early in life, Migrainous symptoms during episodes with positional vertIG, and atypical positional nystagmus.
The mechanics of benign paroxysmal vertigo.
TLDR
Division of BPV into two types (fatiguable and nonfatIGuable) will simplify and rationalize the management of this common complaint.
Human Experience with Canalith Repositioning Maneuvers
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Abstract: Three distinct pathological conditions, related to different means by which dense intralabyrinthine particles interfere with the function of a semicircular canal and cause nystagmus and
A Positional Maneuver for Treatment of Horizontal‐Canal Benign Positional Vertigo
TLDR
The rapid cessation of positional vertigo and nystagmus adds evidence that HC‐BPV is caused by dense particles that move within the canal whenever its orientation toward gravity is changed.
Occurrence of Semicircular Canal Involvement in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
TLDR
All the BPPV variants shared the same clinical and demographic characteristics and responded equally well to treatment, however, differential diagnosis was necessary to apply the appropriate canalith repositioning procedure.
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