Benefits of psychosocial oncology care: Improved quality of life and medical cost offset

@article{Carlson2003BenefitsOP,
  title={Benefits of psychosocial oncology care: Improved quality of life and medical cost offset},
  author={Linda E. Carlson and Barry D. Bultz},
  journal={Health and Quality of Life Outcomes},
  year={2003},
  volume={1},
  pages={8 - 8}
}
The burden of cancer in the worldwide context continues to grow, with an increasing number of new cases and deaths each year. A significant proportion of cancer patients at all stages of the disease trajectory will suffer social, emotional and psychological distress as a result of cancer diagnosis and treatment. Psychosocial interventions have proven efficacious for helping patients and families confront the many issues that arise during this difficult time. This paper reviews the literature… Expand
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