Benefits of choral singing for social and mental wellbeing: qualitative findings from a cross‐national survey of choir members

@article{Livesey2012BenefitsOC,
  title={Benefits of choral singing for social and mental wellbeing: qualitative findings from a cross‐national survey of choir members},
  author={Laetitia Livesey and Ian Morrison and Stephen Clift and Paul M. Camic},
  journal={Journal of Public Mental Health},
  year={2012},
  volume={11},
  pages={10-26}
}
Purpose – The aim of this study is to explore the benefits of choral singing for mental wellbeing and health as perceived by a cross-national sample of amateur choral singers. Design/methodology/approach – Data consisted of written responses to open-ended questions. These were derived from 169 participants selected from a larger dataset reporting high and low levels of emotional wellbeing on the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. A majority of participants were female and aged over 50. A thematic… 

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