Benefits, risks, and costs of stratospheric geoengineering

@article{Robock2009BenefitsRA,
  title={Benefits, risks, and costs of stratospheric geoengineering},
  author={Alan Robock and Allison B. Marquardt and Ben Kravitz and Georgiy L. Stenchikov},
  journal={Geophysical Research Letters},
  year={2009},
  volume={36}
}
Injecting sulfate aerosol precursors into the stratosphere has been suggested as a means of geoengineering to cool the planet and reduce global warming. The decision to implement such a scheme would require a comparison of its benefits, dangers, and costs to those of other responses to global warming, including doing nothing. Here we evaluate those factors for stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols. Using existing U.S. military fighter and tanker planes, the annual costs of… 

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