Beneficial effect of hot spring bathing on stress levels in Japanese macaques

@article{Takeshita2018BeneficialEO,
  title={Beneficial effect of hot spring bathing on stress levels in Japanese macaques},
  author={Rafaela S. C. Takeshita and Fred B. Bercovitch and Kodzue Kinoshita and Michael Alan Huffman},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2018},
  volume={59},
  pages={215-225}
}
The ability of animals to survive dramatic climates depends on their physiology, morphology and behaviour, but is often influenced by the configuration of their habitat. Along with autonomic responses, thermoregulatory behaviours, including postural adjustments, social aggregation, and use of trees for shelter, help individuals maintain homeostasis across climate variations. Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) are the world’s most northerly species of nonhuman primates and have adapted to… 
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