Below One Earth: The Detection, Formation, and Properties of Subterrestrial Worlds

@article{Sinukoff2013BelowOE,
  title={Below One Earth: The Detection, Formation, and Properties of Subterrestrial Worlds},
  author={E. Sinukoff and B. Fulton and L. Scuderi and E. Gaidos},
  journal={Space Science Reviews},
  year={2013},
  volume={180},
  pages={71-99}
}
The Solar System includes two planets—Mercury and Mars—significantly less massive than Earth, and all evidence indicates that planets of similar size orbit many stars. In fact, one of the first exoplanets to be discovered is a lunar-mass planet around a millisecond pulsar. Novel classes of exoplanets have inspired new ideas about planet formation and evolution, and these “sub-Earths” should be no exception: they include planets with masses between Mars and Venus for which there are no Solar… Expand

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