• Corpus ID: 193678449

Belonging While Black: A Choreography of Imagined Silence in Early Modern African Diasporic Dance

@inproceedings{Terry2017BelongingWB,
  title={Belonging While Black: A Choreography of Imagined Silence in Early Modern African Diasporic Dance},
  author={Esther J. Terry},
  year={2017}
}
In this dissertation, I examine specifically how and why historical narratives of African American theatre begin with minstrelsy and Jim Crow’s dancing body. Working with the process of historical production from Michel-Rolph Trouillot’s Silencing the Past, I trace the related emergence of an imagined and Europeanist dancing body alongside the imagined and Black dancing body. I use imagined, following Susan Leigh Foster, because written sources and historical narratives do not facilitate… 

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