Bella Coola I: Phonology

@article{Newman1947BellaCI,
  title={Bella Coola I: Phonology},
  author={Stanley S. Newman},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1947},
  volume={13},
  pages={129 - 134}
}
  • Stanley S. Newman
  • Published 1 July 1947
  • Linguistics
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
1.2. Each of the seven non-glottalized stop and affricative consonants occurs in two allophonic types. These consonants are aspirated before consonants (except syllabic m, n, 1) or before word junctures. In prevocalic position and before syllabic m, n, 1 they occur as intermediates, that is, voiceless unaspirated consonants. The following examples will illustrate these two allophones; in the phonetic writing lower case letters will symbolize the aspirated forms, and capitals will indicate the… 

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