Beliefs and biases in web search

@article{White2013BeliefsAB,
  title={Beliefs and biases in web search},
  author={Ryen W. White},
  journal={Proceedings of the 36th international ACM SIGIR conference on Research and development in information retrieval},
  year={2013}
}
  • Ryen W. White
  • Published 28 July 2013
  • Computer Science
  • Proceedings of the 36th international ACM SIGIR conference on Research and development in information retrieval
People's beliefs, and unconscious biases that arise from those beliefs, influence their judgment, decision making, and actions, as is commonly accepted among psychologists. Biases can be observed in information retrieval in situations where searchers seek or are presented with information that significantly deviates from the truth. There is little understanding of the impact of such biases in search. In this paper we study search-related biases via multiple probes: an exploratory retrospective… 

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