Being the New York Times: The Political Behaviour of a Newspaper

@article{Puglisi2004BeingTN,
  title={Being the New York Times: The Political Behaviour of a Newspaper},
  author={Riccardo Puglisi},
  journal={Public Choice (Topic)},
  year={2004}
}
  • R. Puglisi
  • Published 2004
  • Sociology, Economics
  • Public Choice (Topic)
I analyze a dataset of news from the New York Times, from 1946 to 1997. Controlling for the incumbent President's activity across issues, I find that during the presidential campaign the New York Times gives more emphasis to topics that are owned by the Democratic party (civil rights, health care, labor and social welfare), when the incumbent President is a Republican. This is consistent with the hypothesis that the New York Times has a Democratic partisanship, with some "watchdog" aspects, in… Expand
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