Being accepted for who we are: evidence that social validation of the intrinsic self reduces general defensiveness.

Abstract

Three studies examined the possibility that being liked intrinsically by others--for who one is--reduces self-esteem defense, whereas being liked for what one has achieved does not. All 3 studies contrasted the effects on self-esteem defense of liking based on intrinsic or achievement-related aspects of self. Study 1 showed that thoughts of being liked intrinsically reduced defensive bias toward downward social comparison. Study 2 demonstrated that being liked for intrinsic aspects of self reduced participants' tendency to defensively distance themselves from a negatively portrayed other. Study 3 revealed that being liked for intrinsic aspects of self encouraged a preference for upward over downward counterfactuals for a negative event. In all 3 studies, similar reductions in defensiveness were not found when liking was based on achievements. Discussion focuses on implications for understanding the functional value of different bases of self-worth.

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@article{Schimel2001BeingAF, title={Being accepted for who we are: evidence that social validation of the intrinsic self reduces general defensiveness.}, author={J Schimel and Jeff Arndt and Tom Pyszczynski and Jeff Greenberg}, journal={Journal of personality and social psychology}, year={2001}, volume={80 1}, pages={35-52} }