Behavioural and neurophysiological evidence for face identity and face emotion processing in animals.

@article{Tate2006BehaviouralAN,
  title={Behavioural and neurophysiological evidence for face identity and face emotion processing in animals.},
  author={Andrew J Tate and Hanno Fischer and Andrea E. Leigh and Keith M. Kendrick},
  journal={Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={361 1476},
  pages={2155-72}
}
Visual cues from faces provide important social information relating to individual identity, sexual attraction and emotional state. Behavioural and neurophysiological studies on both monkeys and sheep have shown that specialized skills and neural systems for processing these complex cues to guide behaviour have evolved in a number of mammals and are not present exclusively in humans. Indeed, there are remarkable similarities in the ways that faces are processed by the brain in humans and other… CONTINUE READING