Behavioral evidence for host races in Rhagoletis pomonella flies

@article{Prokopy2004BehavioralEF,
  title={Behavioral evidence for host races in Rhagoletis pomonella flies},
  author={R. Prokopy and S. Diehl and S. Cooley},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={76},
  pages={138-147}
}
SummaryOne of the most controversial putative cases of host race formation in insects is that of the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae). A principal cause of the controversy is lack of relevant data. In laboratory and field enclosure experiments, we compared the host acceptance behavior of sympatric populations of flies originating from naturally infested hawthorn (the native host) and apple (an introduced host) in Amherst, Massachusetts or East Lansing, Michigan. In… Expand
HOST RACE FORMATION AND SYMPATRIC SPECIATION IN RHAGOLETIS FRUIT FLIES ( DIPTERA : TEPHRITIDAE )
In 1866, some 200 years after the introduction of apples to North America, a local newspaper reported that larvae of an unknown fly were infesting apples (Malus pumila) in the Hudson River valley ofExpand
Prior experience influences the fruit residence of male apple maggot flies,Rhagoletis pomonella
TLDR
It is discussed how host fruit learning in males and females, in concert with genetic-based differences in host fruit residence and acceptance behavior between populations of flies originating from hawthorn and apple, could give rise to a reduction in gene flow between population of flies on these two host types. Expand
The Impeccable Timing of the Apple Maggot Fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae), and its Implications for Ecological Speciation
TLDR
To test for how rapid and repeatable shifts in life history timing are driving ecological divergence of R. pomonella in the Pacific Northwestern US, a field-based experiment was used to characterize the host-associated eclosion and flight activity patterns of adults, and the feeding times of larvae at a field site in Vancouver, Washington. Expand
Evidence for inversion polymorphism related to sympatric host race formation in the apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella.
TLDR
Substantial gametic disequilibrium is found among allozyme and complementary DNA markers encompassing the three chromosomal regions differentiating apple and hawthorn flies, suggesting that genes affecting diapause traits involved in host race formation reside within large complexes of rearranged genes. Expand
Differences in oviposition behaviour of two sympatric sibling species of the genus Ostrinia
TLDR
One important result arising from this study is the significant proportion of eggs laid by both Ostrinia species on hop, which may explain why some stands of hop are sometimes not only infested by O. nubilalis larvae, a situation preventing assortative mating based on microallopatry. Expand
The role of diapause and host fruit odor preference in sympatric race formation of Rhagoletis pomonella.
TLDR
The evidence suggests the genetic architecture of diapause and fruit odor discrimination is complicated but resolves that both traits serve as preand post-mating barriers to gene flow. Expand
Facts about Hawthorn and Apple Maggot Flies (Rhagoletis pomonella)
Hawthorn trees grow throughout North America and they produce a small fruit which is eaten by a small fly larva. In 1864, apple growers discovered an unknown maggot had started feeding on apples.Expand
Effects of recent experience on foraging in tephritid fruit flies
TLDR
Overall, C. capitata exhibited a higher propensity to abandon host plants than either R. mendax orR. Expand
Prior experience affects the visual ability ofRhagoletis pomonella flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) to find host fruit
TLDR
Females of the apple maggot fly,Rhagoletis pomonella, were allowed for 3 days to alight upon and oviposit in green or red 18- to 20-mm hawthorn host fruit or green orred 45- to 55-mm apple host fruit hung from branches of potted host trees in field enclosures, and their ability to find fruit of unfamiliar size and color proved unaffected by prior experience with fruit. Expand
Effect of physiological and experiential state ofBactrocera tryoni flies on intra-tree foraging behavior for food (bacteria) and host fruit
TLDR
It is concluded that the first B. tryoni females to arrive on the fruit of a host tree and therefore inoculate the fruit with fruit-fly-type bacteria are unlikely to be sexually immature, but to be mature as a result of having earlier acquired protein elsewhere, and the odor of colonies of fruit- fly- type bacteria when associated with host fruit will attract protein-hungry but not protein-fed females. Expand
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TLDR
Crataegus holmesiana, which produces fruits ripening with mid-season apple cultivars, was the primary hawthorn host of Rhagoletis pomonella in areas surveyed in western New York, and field studies indicated that flies associated with the 2 hosts would oviposit in both fruits if they were available. Expand
Fruit-acceptance Pattern of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) Flies from Different Geographic Regions
TLDR
In laboratory assays, individual Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh) females from infested apples from Nova Scotia, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Oregon were compared for propensity to accept host (hawthorn, apple, and pear) and nonhost fruit (blueberry and tomato). Expand
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TLDR
These findings suggest that inter- ference competition occurs among rival R. pomonella larvae within the same fruit and that older larvae may be competitively dominant. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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