Behavioral and Electrophysiological Responses of Arhopalus tristis to Burnt Pine and Other Stimuli

@article{Suckling2004BehavioralAE,
  title={Behavioral and Electrophysiological Responses of Arhopalus tristis to Burnt Pine and Other Stimuli},
  author={D. Suckling and A. R. Gibb and J. Daly and X. Chen and E. Brockerhoff},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={27},
  pages={1091-1104}
}
The exotic longhorn beetle Arhopalus tristisis a pest of pines, particularly those damaged by fire, and a major export quarantine issue in New Zealand. Actinograph recordings of caged individuals showed that males and females were most active from dusk to midnight. Olfactometer experiments indicated that females moved upwind toward odors from burnt pine (80%, N= 75), compared to unburnt pine (20%). Oviposition choice tests showed that eggs were predominantly laid on burnt logs (79%, N= 20… Expand
Post-fire attractiveness of maritime pines (Pinus pinaster Ait.) to xylophagous insects
The Influence of Host Plant Volatiles on the Attraction of Longhorn Beetles to Pheromones
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