Behavioral analyses of auditory sensitivity inCycnia tenera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae)

@article{Fullard2004BehavioralAO,
  title={Behavioral analyses of auditory sensitivity inCycnia tenera H{\"u}bner (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae)},
  author={James H. Fullard},
  journal={Journal of comparative physiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={129},
  pages={79-83}
}
  • J. Fullard
  • Published 1 March 1979
  • Biology
  • Journal of comparative physiology
SummaryThe auditory characteristics of the arctiid moth,Cycnia tenera were examined using two behavioral criteria, sound production and flight cessation. The majority of the individuals tested indicated a maximum sensitivity to frequencies between 30 and 50 kHz although there is a substantial degree of interindividual variation.Spectral analyses of the echolocation/hunting cries of two species of sympatric, insectivorous bats,Eptesicus fuscus andMyotis lucifugus reveal maximally intense… 
Listening for bats: pulse repetition rate as a cue for a defensive behavior inCycnia tenera (Lepidoptera:Arctiidae)
  • J. Fullard
  • Biology
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A
  • 2004
TLDR
The use of repetition rate information should allow this moth both an unambiguous indication of a bat at very close range as well as the ability to distinguish sources of nocturnal, high-frequency sounds not emitted by predators.
The neuroethology of sound production in tiger moths (Lepidoptera, Arctiidae)
  • J. Fullard
  • Biology
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A
  • 2004
TLDR
It is proposed that the tymbal response in modern arctiids evolved from either flight or walking CPGs and that preadaptive circuitry ancestral to tymbals still exists in modern silent Lepidoptera.
Evasive response to ultrasound by the crepuscular butterfly Manataria maculata
TLDR
This is the first reported case of ultrasonic hearing connected to evasive flights in a true butterfly (Papilionoidea), and it strongly supports the idea that echolocating bats were involved in the evolution of hearing in butterflies.
The echolocation calls of the spotted bat Euderma maculatum are relatively inaudible to moths
Previous studies of the spotted bat Euderma maculatum have demonstrated that this bat emits echolocation calls that are lower in frequency, shorter in duration and fainter in intensity compared with
The influence of moth hearing on bat echolocation strategies
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The ears of moths tested in Canada and Côte d'Ivoire are most sensitive to sounds between 20 and 40 kHz, and much less sensitive to sound over 65 kHz, which suggests the use of low intensity, high frequency echolocation calls may constitute a bat counter-maneuver against insects tuned to bat calls.
Acoustic feature recognition in the dogbane tiger moth, Cycnia tenera
TLDR
It is suggested that, under natural conditions, C. tenera identifies an attacking bat by recognizing the pulse period of its echolocation calls but that this feature recognition is influenced by acoustic power and can be overridden by unnaturally intense sounds.
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It is argued that T. fovea can survive making such a noise in spite of being palatable to bats because it flies so late in the year that it is temporally isolated from bats.
The adaptive function of tiger moth clicks against echolocating bats: an experimental and synthetic approach
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These findings support the hypotheses that the clicks of arctiid moths are both an active defence (through echolocation disruption) and a reliable indicator of chemical defence against aerial-hawking bats.
Arctiid moth clicks can degrade the accuracy of range difference discrimination in echolocating big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus
  • L. Miller
  • Biology
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A
  • 2004
TLDR
Four big brown bats born and raised in captivity were trained using the Yes/No psychophysical method to report whether a virtual sonar target was at a standard distance or not, and clicks presented for the very first time could startle naive bats to different degrees depending on the individual.
Bats and moths: what is there left to learn?
TLDR
The interaction between bats and moths has much to interest general biologists, and may provide a useful model in understanding the neurophysiological basis of behaviour, including protean escape behaviours.
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