Behavioral Development after Forelimb Deafferentation on Day of Birth in Monkeys with and without Blinding

@article{Taub1973BehavioralDA,
  title={Behavioral Development after Forelimb Deafferentation on Day of Birth in Monkeys with and without Blinding},
  author={Edward Taub and P Perrella and Gilbert Barro},
  journal={Science},
  year={1973},
  volume={181},
  pages={959 - 960}
}
Four infant monkeys underwent somatosensory deafferentation of both forelimbs within hours after birth. Ambulation, climbing, and reaching toward objects developed spontaneously in each case. Thumb-forefinger prehension could be trained by operant shaping methods. Two infants deafferented at birth and blinded by eyelid closure were retarded in motor development by only 1 to 2 weeks. Results indicate that topographic sensory feedback and autogenetic spinal reflexes are not necessary after birth… 

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