Behavioral, neurophysiological and evolutionary perspectives on unihemispheric sleep

@article{Rattenborg2000BehavioralNA,
  title={Behavioral, neurophysiological and evolutionary perspectives on unihemispheric sleep},
  author={Niels C. Rattenborg and Charles J. Amlaner and Steven L Lima},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2000},
  volume={24},
  pages={817-842}
}
Several animals mitigate the fundamental conflict between sleep and wakefulness by engaging in unihemispheric sleep, a unique state during which one cerebral hemisphere sleeps while the other remains awake. Among mammals, unihemispheric sleep is restricted to aquatic species (Cetaceans, eared seals and manatees). In contrast to mammals, unihemispheric sleep is widespread in birds, and may even occur in reptiles. Unihemispheric sleep allows surfacing to breathe in aquatic mammals and predator… Expand
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