Behavior of Antarctic Krill, Euphausia superba: Chemoreception, Feeding, Schooling, and Molting

@article{Hamner1983BehaviorOA,
  title={Behavior of Antarctic Krill, Euphausia superba: Chemoreception, Feeding, Schooling, and Molting},
  author={William M. Hamner and Peggy P. Hamner and Steven W. Strand and Ronald W. Gilmer},
  journal={Science},
  year={1983},
  volume={220},
  pages={433 - 435}
}
Krill do not feed by passive, continuous filtration but use area-intensive searching and various rapid feeding behaviors to exploit local high food concentrations. Chemicals alone at low concentrations, not particles, trigger feeding. Krill form dense schools that move rapidly and migrate primarily horizontally. Abrupt disruption of a school can trigger mass molting, and molts may act as decoys. 

Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba dana) eat salps

Feeding behaviour of Antarctic krill on salps was observed in shipboard experiments during the 1994/1995 Kaiyo Maru Antarctic Ocean research cruise and evidence implies that the substances extracted from salps were most attractive to krill.

Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba Dana) eat salps

Abstract Feeding behaviour of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) on salps was observed in shipboard experiments during the 1994/1995 Kaiyo Maru Antarctic Ocean research cruise. The feeding rate was

Schooling behavior of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) in laboratory aquaria: Reactions to chemical and visual stimuli

The conditions necessary for aquarium schooling are described and the importance of an appropriate social environment for displays of escape, avoidance, and feeding behaviors and of positional preference within the school is discussed.

Feeding and Food Processing in Antarctic Krill (Euphausia superba Dana)

Euphausia superba is exceptional among euphausiids for the large filtering surface of the feeding basket and its fine mesh size (2–3 μm), which remain into adulthood. This enables them to feed

Synchronous moulting of krill, Euphausia superba, in the Bransfield Strait (Antarctica)

A large mass of cast exoskeletons of the Ant- arctic krill Euphausia superba was fished in February 2001 at one station in the Bransfield Strait and corresponded to a krill abundance of 1,480-48,000 individuals per 1,000 m 3 .

Behavior of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba): schooling, foraging, and antipredatory behavior

Euphausia superba makes an abrupt behavioral transition after the last larval molt from an individualistic, planktonic lifestyle to that of a highly social, nektonic juvenile.

OMNIVORY BY EUPHAUSIA-PACIFICA - THE ROLE OF COPEPOD PREY

  • D.
  • Environmental Science
  • 2006
: Adult Euphausia pacifica obtain a maximum carbon-specific ration of 8.8 % d-' from the centrlc diatom Thalassiosira angstii and 0.45 % d-l from the copepod Pseudocalanus sp. E. pacifica exhibits a

FEEDING OF THE ANTARCTIC KRILL EUPHAUSIA SUPERBA

ABSTRACT Measurements of rates of feeding indicate that Euphausia superba can feed on particles ranging from nanophytoplankton to macrozooplankton; a typical animal of 120 mg dry weight processes

Prey densities and foraging of humpback whales,Megaptera novaeangliae

Analysis of simultaneous sonor scans from a surface vessel and film from a remotely operated underwater camera show that euphausiids form extremely dense micropatches upon which humpback whales feed.

Omnivory by Euphausia pacifica : the role of copepod prey

  • D.
  • Environmental Science
  • 2006
Adult Euphausia pacifica obtain a maximum carbon-specific ration of 8.8 % d' from the centrlc diatom Thalassiosira angstii and 0.45 % d-l from the copepod Pseudocalanus sp. E. pacifica exhibits a
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