Begging in the absence of sibling competition in Wilson’s storm-petrels, Oceanites oceanicus

@article{Quillfeldt2002BeggingIT,
  title={Begging in the absence of sibling competition in Wilson’s storm-petrels, Oceanites oceanicus
},
  author={Petra Quillfeldt},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2002},
  volume={64},
  pages={579-587}
}
Abstract Begging displays of nestlings in multichick broods can signal both hunger and competitive ability. Studies of begging in species with single-chick broods exclude the influence of nestling competition and may provide especially useful models for the study of signalling during parent–offspring conflict. However, there is no evidence that chicks signal hunger by begging in the absence of sibling competition. I tested predictions of signalling models in a species with single-chick broods… Expand
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