Begging and transfer of coati meat by white-faced capuchin monkeys,Cebus capucinus

@article{Perry2006BeggingAT,
  title={Begging and transfer of coati meat by white-faced capuchin monkeys,Cebus capucinus},
  author={Susan E Perry and Lisa M. Rose},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2006},
  volume={35},
  pages={409-415}
}
White-faced capuchin monkeys were frequently observed to raid the nests and predate the pups of coatis at two study sites (Santa Rosa National Park and Lomas Barbudal Biological Reserve) in northwestern Costa Rica. Adult monkeys of both sexes were the primary participants in nest-raiding. At Santa Rosa, the original captor of the pup tended to eat the entire carcass, whereas at Lomas Barbudal, the monkeys rapidly became satiated and allowed another monkey to have the carcass. At Lomas Barbudal… 

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