Before your very eyes: the value and limitations of eye tracking in medical education

@article{Kok2017BeforeYV,
  title={Before your very eyes: the value and limitations of eye tracking in medical education},
  author={Ellen M. Kok and Halszka Jarodzka},
  journal={Medical Education},
  year={2017},
  volume={51}
}
Medicine is a highly visual discipline. Physicians from many specialties constantly use visual information in diagnosis and treatment. However, they are often unable to explain how they use this information. Consequently, it is unclear how to train medical students in this visual processing. Eye tracking is a research technique that may offer answers to these open questions, as it enables researchers to investigate such visual processes directly by measuring eye movements. This may help… 

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