Bees without Flowers: Before Peak Bloom, Diverse Native Bees Find Insect-Produced Honeydew Sugars

@article{Meiners2017BeesWF,
  title={Bees without Flowers: Before Peak Bloom, Diverse Native Bees Find Insect-Produced Honeydew Sugars},
  author={Joan M. Meiners and Terry Griswold and David J. Harris and S. K. Morgan Ernest},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2017},
  volume={190},
  pages={281 - 291}
}
Bee foragers respond to complex visual, olfactory, and extrasensory cues to optimize searches for floral rewards. Their abilities to detect and distinguish floral colors, shapes, volatiles, and ultraviolet signals and even gauge nectar availability from changes in floral humidity or electric fields are well studied. Bee foraging behaviors in the absence of floral cues, however, are rarely considered. We observed 42 species of wild bees visiting inconspicuous, nonflowering shrubs during early… 

Decision letter for "Relative bee abundance varies by collection method and flowering richness: Implications for understanding patterns in bee community data"

TLDR
Examination of multiple years of intensive seasonal sampling of plant and bee communities finds strong seasonal changes in the abundance, but not the richness, of bees captured in pan traps, and if they were affected by the availability of floral resources.

Bumble bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Bombus terrestris) collecting honeydew from the giant willow aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

TLDR
Monitoring sugar concentrations of fresh honeydew and compared them with the concentrations of the crop contents of worker bumble bees foraging from the leaf litter show that the concentration of sugar in fresh Honeydew was as much as 10% w/w lower than that collected from leaf surfaces, as measured from the crop Contents of foragers.

Psyllid honeydew as a Bombus food source in the boreal landscape

Bumblebees are opportunistic resource consumers and have been known to visit extrafloral nectaries and harvest aphid and scale honeydew. We report the first observation of bumblebees foraging psyllid

Settling on leaves or flowers: herbivore feeding site determines the outcome of indirect interactions between herbivores and pollinators

TLDR
Investigation of the effect of variation in feeding site of herbivorous insects on the visitation by insect pollinators on flowering Brassica nigra plants concludes that herbivore feeding site choice can profoundly affect Herbivore–pollinator interactions and feeding site thereby makes for an important herbivor trait that can determine the linkage between antagonistic and mutualistic networks.

Insecticide‐contaminated honeydew: risks for beneficial insects

TLDR
A new area of research is opened in the field of ecotoxicology to understand how insecticides can reach non‐target beneficial insects and shed light on potential undescribed causes of insect declines in ecosystems where honeydew is an important carbohydrate source for insects.

The influence of data type and functional traits on native bee phenology metrics: Opportunistic versus inventory records

TLDR
Comparing phenological metrics calculated from intensive systematic inventory data with those from opportunistic museum records for bee species spanning a range of functional traits reveal a strong influence of data type on phenology metrics that necessitates consideration of data source when evaluating changes in phenological activity.

Decades of native bee biodiversity surveys at Pinnacles National Park highlight the importance of monitoring natural areas over time

Thousands of species of bees are in global decline, yet research addressing the ecology and status of these wild pollinators lags far behind work being done to address similar impacts on the managed

Three decades of native bee biodiversity surveys at Pinnacles National Park highlight the importance of monitoring natural areas over time

Thousands of species of bees are in global decline, yet research addressing the ecology and status of these wild pollinators lags far behind work being done to address similar impacts on the managed

IDENTIFICATION OF GRAIN SORGHUM RESISTANCE TO SUGARCANE APHID AND FIELD TEST OF RESPONSE BY HYMENOPTERA TO HONEYDEW By MICHAEL ADDISON CABALLERO

Grain sorghum, Sorghum bicolor, is one of the most important crops worldwide as it can be used for human consumption, biofuel, and livestock feed. In 2013, the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari

Detecting the macroevolutionary signal of species interactions

TLDR
Overall, although the evidence for species interactions shaping macroevolution is strong, further work using integrative and model‐based approaches is needed to spur progress towards understanding the complex dynamics that structure communities over time and space.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 62 REFERENCES

Honeydew feeding in the solitary bee Osmia bicornis as affected by aphid species and nectar availability.

Detection and Learning of Floral Electric Fields by Bumblebees

TLDR
A formerly unappreciated sensory modality in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris), detection of floral electric fields is reported, which may facilitate rapid and dynamic communication between flowers and their pollinators.

Assessing the ecological significance of bee visual detection and colour discrimination on the evolution of flower colours

TLDR
The results show that the interaction between colour discrimination and detection is important for understanding flower community assembly, and identify those bird-pollinated species whose floral colours had spectral characteristics similar to the stimulus used in the Y-maze experiment.

The ecology of solitary bees

TLDR
The development of management procedures which will permit increased utilization of native solitary bees and perhaps lead to the importation of foreign species native to the areas in which the authors' agricultural crops originated, requires a detailed knowledge of the ecology, or environmental relationships, of these bees.

Can Alternative Sugar Sources Buffer Pollinators From Nectar Shortages?

TLDR
The results show that honeydew resources can impact floral visitation patterns and suggest that future pollinator studies should consider the full range of sugar resources present in the study environment.

The evolution of floral scent: the influence of olfactory learning by insect pollinators on the honest signalling of floral rewards

TLDR
It is expected that an important yet commonly overlooked function of floral scent is an improvement in short-term pollinator specificity which provides an advantage to both pollinator and plant over the use of a visual signal alone.

Olfactory eavesdropping between two competing stingless bee species

TLDR
It is suggested that stingless bees may seek to avoid conflict through their eavesdropping behavior, incorporating expected costs associated with a choice into the decision-making process.

Floral Biology, Microclimate, and Pollination by Ectothermic Bees in an Early‐Blooming Herb

TLDR
The favorable microclimate within N. longispathus flowers, their long duration, and the thermal biology, foraging behavior, and thermoregulatory ability of A. bicolor, were critical elements in this early-season pollination system.

Collection of wax scale (Ceroplastes sp.) by the honey bee Apis mellifera

TLDR
During an investigation of pollen flora recording in Thessaloniki, Greece, pollen traps were placed on the entrances of ten hives of the honey bee each containing six frames, and noticed a significant number of wax covers of a soft scale insect Ceroplastes sp.

Behavioural ecology: Bees associate warmth with floral colour

TLDR
It is shown that bumblebees prefer to visit warmer flowers and that they can learn to use colour to predict floral temperature before landing, in what could be a widespread floral adaptation, plants may modulate their temperature to encourage pollinators to visit.
...