Becoming Full Citizens: The U.S. Women’s Jury Rights Campaigns, the Pace of Reform, and Strategic Adaptation1

@article{Mccammon2008BecomingFC,
  title={Becoming Full Citizens: The U.S. Women’s Jury Rights Campaigns, the Pace of Reform, and Strategic Adaptation1},
  author={Holly J. Mccammon and S. Chaudhuri and L. Hewitt and C. Muse and Harmony D. Newman and C. Smith and Teresa M. Terrell},
  journal={American Journal of Sociology},
  year={2008},
  volume={113},
  pages={1104 - 1147}
}
Few studies of social movement political success investigate the strategic and tactical approaches used to achieve positive political outcomes. This work investigates a rarely studied mobilization of U.S. women in the first half of the 20th century to explore how movement organizations bring about legal change. Archival data for 15 states are examined to investigate how women won the right to sit on juries. The authors argue that jury movement activists engaged in strategic adaptation were more… Expand
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