Beautiful parents have more daughters: a further implication of the generalized Trivers-Willard hypothesis (gTWH).

@article{Kanazawa2007BeautifulPH,
  title={Beautiful parents have more daughters: a further implication of the generalized Trivers-Willard hypothesis (gTWH).},
  author={Satoshi Kanazawa},
  journal={Journal of theoretical biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={244 1},
  pages={
          133-40
        }
}
The generalized Trivers-Willard hypothesis (gTWH) [Kanazawa, S., 2005. Big and tall parents have more sons: further generalizations of the Trivers-Willard hypothesis. J. Theor. Biol. 235, 583-590) proposes that parents who possess any heritable trait which increases the male reproductive success at a greater rate than female reproductive success in a given environment will have a higher-than-expected offspring sex ratio, and parents who possess any heritable trait which increases the female… CONTINUE READING
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