Beautiful Faces Have Variable Reward Value fMRI and Behavioral Evidence

@article{Aharon2001BeautifulFH,
  title={Beautiful Faces Have Variable Reward Value fMRI and Behavioral Evidence},
  author={I. Aharon and N. Etcoff and D. Ariely and C. Chabris and E. O'Connor and H. Breiter},
  journal={Neuron},
  year={2001},
  volume={32},
  pages={537-551}
}
The brain circuitry processing rewarding and aversive stimuli is hypothesized to be at the core of motivated behavior. In this study, discrete categories of beautiful faces are shown to have differing reward values and to differentially activate reward circuitry in human subjects. In particular, young heterosexual males rate pictures of beautiful males and females as attractive, but exert effort via a keypress procedure only to view pictures of attractive females. Functional magnetic resonance… Expand
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