Beating the news using social media: the case study of American Idol

@article{Ciulla2012BeatingTN,
  title={Beating the news using social media: the case study of American Idol},
  author={Fabio Ciulla and Delia Mocanu and Andrea Baronchelli and Bruno Gonçalves and Nicola Perra and Alessandro Vespignani},
  journal={EPJ Data Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={1},
  pages={1-11}
}
We present a contribution to the debate on the predictability of social events using big data analytics. We focus on the elimination of contestants in the American Idol TV shows as an example of a well defined electoral phenomenon that each week draws millions of votes in the USA. This event can be considered as basic test in a simplified environment to assess the predictive power of Twitter signals. We provide evidence that Twitter activity during the time span defined by the TV show airing… 
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