Bats and moths: what is there left to learn?

@article{Waters2003BatsAM,
  title={Bats and moths: what is there left to learn?},
  author={Dean A. Waters},
  journal={Physiological Entomology},
  year={2003},
  volume={28}
}
  • D. Waters
  • Published 1 December 2003
  • Biology
  • Physiological Entomology
Abstract.  Over 14 families of moths have ears that are adapted to detect the ultrasonic echolocation calls of bats. On hearing a bat, these moths respond with an escape response that reduces their chances of being caught. As an evolutionary response, bats may then have evolved behavioural strategies or changes in call design to overcome the moth's hearing. The nature of this interaction is reviewed. In particular, the role of the echolocation calls of bats in the shaping of the structure… Expand
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