Basiepidermal nervous system in Nemertoderma westbladi (Nemertodermatida): GYIRFamide immunoreactivity.

@article{Raikova2004BasiepidermalNS,
  title={Basiepidermal nervous system in Nemertoderma westbladi (Nemertodermatida): GYIRFamide immunoreactivity.},
  author={O. Raikova and M. Reuter and M. Gustafsson and A. Maule and D. Halton and U. Jondelius},
  journal={Zoology},
  year={2004},
  volume={107 1},
  pages={
          75-86
        }
}
The Nemertodermatida are a small group of microscopic marine worms. Recent molecular studies have demonstrated that they are likely to be the earliest extant bilaterian animals. What was the nervous system (NS) of a bilaterian ancestor like? In order to answer that question, the NS of Nemertoderma westbladi was investigated by means of indirect immunofluorescence technique and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The antibodies to a flatworm neuropeptide GYIRFamide were used in combination with… Expand
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