Basic science and clinical studies coincide: active treatment approach is needed after a sports injury

@article{Kannus2003BasicSA,
  title={Basic science and clinical studies coincide: active treatment approach is needed after a sports injury},
  author={P. Kannus and J. Parkkari and T. J{\"a}rvinen and M. J{\"a}rvinen},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Medicine \& Science in Sports},
  year={2003},
  volume={13}
}
The basic response to injury at the tissue level is well known and consists of acute inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and maturation and remodeling phase. Knowing these phases, the treatment and rehabilitation program of athletes' acute musculoskeletal injuries should use a short period of immobilization followed by controlled and progressive mobilization. Both experimental and clinical trials have given systematic and convincing evidence that this program is superior to immobilization… Expand
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