Basal and dexamethasone suppressed salivary cortisol concentrations in a community sample of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder

@article{Lindley2004BasalAD,
  title={Basal and dexamethasone suppressed salivary cortisol concentrations in a community sample of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder},
  author={Steven E. Lindley and Eve Carlson and Maryse Beno{\^i}t},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2004},
  volume={55},
  pages={940-945}
}
BACKGROUND Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with lower concentrations of cortisol and enhanced suppression of cortisol by dexamethasone, although discrepancies exist among reports. The objective of the study was to determine the pattern of cortisol responses in patients seeking treatment for PTSD resulting from a variety of traumatic experiences and to test whether cortisol responses are significantly related to childhood trauma, severity of symptoms, or length of time… Expand
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