Barnyard grass-induced rice allelopathy and momilactone B.

@article{KatoNoguchi2011BarnyardGR,
  title={Barnyard grass-induced rice allelopathy and momilactone B.},
  author={H. Kato‐Noguchi},
  journal={Journal of plant physiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={168 10},
  pages={
          1016-20
        }
}
Here, we investigated chemical-mediated interaction between crop and weeds. Allelopathic activity of rice seedlings exhibited 5.3-6.3-fold increases when rice and barnyard grass seedlings were grown together, where there may be the competitive interference between rice and barnyard grass for nutrients. Barnyard grass is one of the most noxious weeds in rice cultivation. The momilactone B concentration in rice seedlings incubated with barnyard grass seedlings was 6.9-fold greater than that in… Expand
The chemical-mediated allelopathic interaction between rice and barnyard grass
TLDR
Barnyard grass may response to the presence of neighboring rice by sensing momilactone B in rice root exudates and increase allelopathic activity, suggesting that momilactsone B may not only act as a rice allelochemical but also play an important role in rice-induced allelopathy of barnyard grass. Expand
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Rice allelopathy may be one of the inducible defense mechanisms by chemical-mediated plant interaction be-tween rice and barnyardgrass and the induced-allelopathy may provide a competitive advan-tage for rice through suppression of the growth of barnyard Grass. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Allelopathic rice can interfere with the growth of penoxsulam-resistant barnyardgrass through allelochemical-mediated root interactions, which may provide a non-herbicidal alternative for herbicide-resistant weed management in paddy systems. Expand
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TLDR
The results suggest that rice plants of allelopathic cultivars appear to be able to detect the presence of competing barnyardgrass and respond by decreasing production of growth-stimulating allantoin, regulating the growth of barnyard grass. Expand
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TLDR
Allelopathic rice interferes with paddy weeds by altering root placement patterns and root interactions, the first case of a root behavioural strategy in crop-weed allelopathic interaction. Expand
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TLDR
Reverse genetic approach by inserting genes knock-out of OsCPS4 and OsKSL4 into two rice cultivars from Japonica subspecies showed that insertional mutant lines harboring cps4 or ksl4 exhibited a significant loss in inhibition potential due to the lack of momilactones production. Expand
Allelobiosis in the interference of allelopathic wheat with weeds.
TLDR
Through root-secreted chemical signals, allelopathic wheat can detect competing weeds and respond by increased allelochemical levels to inhibit them, providing an advantage for its own growth. Expand
The response of allelopathic rice growth and microbial feedback to barnyardgrass infestation in a paddy field experiment
TLDR
It is indicated that shifts in microbial community composition induced by barnyardgrass infestation may generate positive feedback on rice growth and reproduction in a given paddy system. Expand
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