Bark beetles and pinhole borers (Curculionidae, Scolytinae, Platypodinae) alien to Europe

@article{RKirkendall2010BarkBA,
  title={Bark beetles and pinhole borers (Curculionidae, Scolytinae, Platypodinae) alien to Europe},
  author={Lawrence R. Kirkendall and Massimo Faccoli},
  journal={ZooKeys},
  year={2010},
  pages={227 - 251}
}
Abstract Invasive bark beetles are posing a major threat to forest resources around the world. DAISIE’s web-based and printed databases of invasive species in Europe provide an incomplete and misleading picture of the alien scolytines and platypodines. We present a review of the alien bark beetle fauna of Europe based on primary literature through 2009. We find that there are 18 Scolytinae and one Platypodinae species apparently established in Europe, from 14 different genera. Seventeen species… 
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