Barista rants about stupid customers at Starbucks: What imaginary conversations can teach us about real ones

@inproceedings{Manning2008BaristaRA,
  title={Barista rants about stupid customers at Starbucks: What imaginary conversations can teach us about real ones},
  author={Paul Manning},
  year={2008}
}
Abstract Approaches to the phenomenon of ‘talk’ have been polarized between very different, apparently irreconcilable or incommensurable, antinomic approaches to the phenomenon (and the kinds of data, ‘real’ or ‘imagined’, that can be used), characterizable as ‘technical’ versus ‘normative’, ‘generic’ versus ‘genred’ views of talk. By looking at how Starbucks baristas recount dialogs with ‘stupid’ customers as part of ‘rants’ or ‘vents’ about service work, we find that there is a common model… CONTINUE READING

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