Barcoding the butterflies of southern South America: Species delimitation efficacy, cryptic diversity and geographic patterns of divergence

@article{Lavinia2017BarcodingTB,
  title={Barcoding the butterflies of southern South America: Species delimitation efficacy, cryptic diversity and geographic patterns of divergence},
  author={Pablo D Lavinia and Ezequiel O N{\'u}{\~n}ez Bustos and Cecilia Kopuchian and Dar{\'i}o A. Lijtmaer and Natalia C. Garc{\'i}a and Paul D. N. Hebert and Pablo L. Tubaro},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2017},
  volume={12}
}
Because the tropical regions of America harbor the highest concentration of butterfly species, its fauna has attracted considerable attention. Much less is known about the butterflies of southern South America, particularly Argentina, where over 1,200 species occur. To advance understanding of this fauna, we assembled a DNA barcode reference library for 417 butterfly species of Argentina, focusing on the Atlantic Forest, a biodiversity hotspot. We tested the efficacy of this library for… 

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