Balloon Hashing: A Memory-Hard Function Providing Provable Protection Against Sequential Attacks

@inproceedings{Boneh2016BalloonHA,
  title={Balloon Hashing: A Memory-Hard Function Providing Provable Protection Against Sequential Attacks},
  author={Dan Boneh and Henry Corrigan-Gibbs and Stuart E. Schechter},
  booktitle={ASIACRYPT},
  year={2016}
}
We present the Balloon password-hashing algorithm. This is the first practical cryptographic hash function that: (i) has proven memory-hardness properties in the random-oracle model, (ii) uses a password-independent access pattern, and (iii) meets—and often exceeds—the performance of the best heuristically secure password-hashing algorithms. Memory-hard functions require a large amount of working space to evaluate efficiently and, when used for password hashing, they dramatically increase the… 
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