Bacterial iron homeostasis.

@article{Andrews2003BacterialIH,
  title={Bacterial iron homeostasis.},
  author={Simon C. Andrews and Andrea K Robinson and Francisco Rodr{\'i}guez-Qui{\~n}ones},
  journal={FEMS microbiology reviews},
  year={2003},
  volume={27 2-3},
  pages={
          215-37
        }
}
Iron is essential to virtually all organisms, but poses problems of toxicity and poor solubility. Bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to counter the problems imposed by their iron dependence, allowing them to achieve effective iron homeostasis under a range of iron regimes. Highly efficient iron acquisition systems are used to scavenge iron from the environment under iron-restricted conditions. In many cases, this involves the secretion and internalisation of extracellular ferric chelators… Expand
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