Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis

@article{GurianSherman1993BacterialIN,
  title={Bacterial ice nucleation: significance and molecular basis},
  author={D. Gurian-Sherman and S. Lindow},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={1993},
  volume={7},
  pages={1338 - 1343}
}
Several bacterial species are able to catalyse ice formation at temperatures as warm as –2°C. These microorganisms efficiently catalyze ice formation at temperatures much higher than most organic or inorganic substances. Because of their ubiquity on the surfaces of frost‐sensitive plants, they are responsible for initiating ice formation, which results in frost injury. The high temperature of ice catalysis conferred by bacterial ice nuclei makes them useful in ice nucleation‐limited processes… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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