Bacterial cell shape

@article{Cabeen2005BacterialCS,
  title={Bacterial cell shape},
  author={Matthew T. Cabeen and Christine Jacobs-Wagner},
  journal={Nature Reviews Microbiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={3},
  pages={601-610}
}
Bacterial species have long been classified on the basis of their characteristic cell shapes. Despite intensive research, the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of bacterial cell shape remain largely unresolved. The field has recently taken an important step forward with the discovery that eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins have homologues in bacteria that affect cell shape. Here, we discuss how a bacterium gains and maintains its shape, the challenges still… Expand

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