Bacterial cell attachment, the beginning of a biofilm

@article{Palmer2007BacterialCA,
  title={Bacterial cell attachment, the beginning of a biofilm},
  author={J. Palmer and S. Flint and J. Brooks},
  journal={Journal of Industrial Microbiology \& Biotechnology},
  year={2007},
  volume={34},
  pages={577-588}
}
The ability of bacteria to attach to surfaces and develop into a biofilm has been of considerable interest to many groups in numerous industries, including the medical and food industry. However, little is understood in the critical initial step seen in all biofilm development, the initial bacterial cell attachment to a surface. This initial attachment is critical for the formation of a bacterial biofilm, as all other cells within a biofilm structure rely on the interaction between surface and… Expand
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