Bacterial DNA ligases

@article{Wilkinson2001BacterialDL,
  title={Bacterial DNA ligases},
  author={Adam Wilkinson and Jonathan Day and Richard Bowater},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={40}
}
DNA ligases join breaks in the phosphodiester backbone of DNA molecules and are used in many essential reactions within the cell. All DNA ligases follow the same reaction mechanism, but they may use either ATP or NAD+ as a cofactor. All Bacteria (eubacteria) contain NAD+‐dependent DNA ligases, and the uniqueness of these enzymes to Bacteria makes them an attractive target for novel antibiotics. In addition to their NAD+‐dependent enzymes, some Bacteria contain genes for putative ATP‐dependent… 
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