Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica

@article{Ainsworth2008BacteriaAN,
  title={Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica},
  author={Tracy D. Ainsworth and Maoz Fine and George Roff and Ove Hoegh‐Guldberg},
  journal={The ISME Journal},
  year={2008},
  volume={2},
  pages={67-73}
}
Coral bleaching occurs when the endosymbiosis between corals and their symbionts disintegrates during stress. Mass coral bleaching events have increased over the past 20 years and are directly correlated with periods of warm sea temperatures. However, some hypotheses have suggested that reef-building corals bleach due to infection by bacterial pathogens. The ‘Bacterial Bleaching’ hypothesis is based on laboratory studies of the Mediterranean invading coral, Oculina patagonica, and has further… 

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