Back to Kant: Reinterpreting the Democratic Peace as a Macrohistorical Learning Process

@article{Cederman2001BackTK,
  title={Back to Kant: Reinterpreting the Democratic Peace as a Macrohistorical Learning Process},
  author={Lars-Erik Cederman},
  journal={American Political Science Review},
  year={2001},
  volume={95},
  pages={15 - 31}
}
  • L. Cederman
  • Published 1 March 2001
  • Political Science
  • American Political Science Review
The contemporary international relations literature links the democratic peace hypothesis to Kant’s famous peace plan. Yet, whether attempting to prove or disprove the hypothesis, most quantitative studies have lost sight of important dimensions of the Kantian vision. I reinterpret the democratic peace as a dynamic and dialectical learning process. In order to assess the dynamic dimension of this process (while controlling for exogenous dialectical reversals), I rely on quantitative evidence… 

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