Babbling and first words in children with slow expressive development

@article{Fasolo2008BabblingAF,
  title={Babbling and first words in children with slow expressive development},
  author={Mirco Fasolo and Marinella Majorano and Laura D’Odorico},
  journal={Clinical Linguistics \& Phonetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={22},
  pages={83 - 94}
}
This study examined early vocal production to assess whether it is possible to identify predictors of vocabulary development prior to the age point at which lexical delay is usually identified. Characteristics of babbling and first words in 12 Italian children with slow expressive development (late talkers; LT) were compared with those of 12 typically developing (TD) peers. Syllable structure and phonetic characteristics of babbling and first words produced by both groups of children at 20… 

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