Babbling and early speech: continuity and individual differences

@article{Locke1989BabblingAE,
  title={Babbling and early speech: continuity and individual differences},
  author={John L. Locke},
  journal={First Language},
  year={1989},
  volume={9},
  pages={191 - 205}
}
  • J. Locke
  • Published 1 January 1989
  • Psychology
  • First Language
One of the recognized precursors to speaking is babbling. The related- ness of these activities is suggested, in the typical case, by the develop mentally continuous manner in which babbling flows into and coexists with speaking, the shared morphology of babble and speech, and the socially similar ways that children display (and presumably use) babbling and speaking. Nevertheless, the developmental significance of babbling is unknown. In this paper, I sample findings on normally developing… Expand

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To understand the ontogeny of language, the authors need to learn which cases are which and to know how these interactions occur and change over the course of acquisition. Expand
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