BTB Readers Guide: Loyalty

@article{Crook2004BTBRG,
  title={BTB Readers Guide: Loyalty},
  author={Zeba A. Crook},
  journal={Biblical Theology Bulletin},
  year={2004},
  volume={34},
  pages={167 - 177}
}
This article looks at the nature of ancient loyalty, stressing its external (relationship) as opposed to its internal (emotional) features, and confirms this through an analysis of loyalty within three types of Graeco-Roman patronage— client kingship, manumission, and relationships with philosophical teachers. It then looks at examples of loyalty in the First and Second Testaments, noting the extent to which the former are similar or different from the latter, and makes some observations… Expand
The 'cloud of witnesses' as part of the public court of reputation in Hebrews
By drawing parallels with the function of ancestors in African traditional religions, this article looks at the possibility that the Israelite ancestors mentioned in Hebrews played a far more dynamicExpand
‘By faith alone’ (undivided loyalty) in light of change agency theory: Jesus, Paul and the Jesus-group in Colossae
This research is part of the research project, ‘Biblical Theology and Hermeneutics’, directed by Prof. Dr Andries van Aarde, professor emeritus and senior fellow in the Unit for Advancement ofExpand
The Politics of Patronage and the Politics of Kinship: The Meeting of the Ways
Scholarship on patronage in the ancient Mediterranean world abounds but is not unanimous in its understanding of how the patronage system worked, how it was present in the pre-Roman Greek world, andExpand
Reading the Areopagus Speech in Acts 17 from the Perspective of Sacral Manumission of Slaves in Ancient Greece
This article suggests that the metaphor of Paul as seed-picker who gathers dirt from the market in Athens (Acts 17:18) is part of the broad slave metaphor found in Greco-Roman literature and in theExpand
David and His Friends: Social-Scientific Perspectives on the David-Jonathan Friendship
The narrative of the David and Jonathan friendship in 1 Samuel continues to fascinate modern readers as a tale of an enduring friendship under strong political and family pressures. Modern readersExpand
Engendering Gossip in Galatians 2:11–14: The Social Dynamics of Honor, Shame, Performance, and Gossip
From a sociological perspective, the fundamental elements necessary for speech to be considered gossip are “face-to-face” evaluative communication between/among persons about an absent third party.Expand
The Role and Function of Lydia as a Rhetorical Construct in Acts: A Sociorhetorical and Theological Interpretation
The Role and Function of Lydia as a Rhetorical Construct in Acts: A Sociorhetorical and Theological Interpretation This thesis investigates whether Lydia of Thyatira functions as a figure that has aExpand
Reading the Areopagus speech in Acts 17 from the perspective of sacral manumission of slaves in Ancient Greece
This article suggests that the metaphor of Paul as seed-picker who gathers dirt from the market in Athens (Acts 17:18) is part of the broad slave metaphor found in Greco-Roman literature and in the...
I'm okay, you're not okay: constancy of character and Paul's understanding of change in his own and Peter's behaviour
Paul argues in Galatians 2:11–14 that Peter was guilty of hypocrisy because he had withdrawn from eating with Gentiles in Antioch. Paul’s argument is best understood through the social and rhetoricalExpand
Mapping human dignity in the New Testament : concerns, considerations and concepts
Enquiring about hermeneutical and methodological considerations appropriate to studies on the modern concept of ‘human dignity’ in the New Testament, some initial concerns are raised about theExpand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 62 REFERENCES
Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire
The Roman empire remains unique. Although Rome claimed to rule the world, it did not. Rather, its uniqueness stems from the culture it created and the loyalty it inspired across an area thatExpand
Reconceptualising Conversion: Patronage, Loyalty, and Conversion in the Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean
Combining classical, epigraphical, and biblical sources with social-scientific methodology, this monograph questions the way in which modern scholarship has tended to discuss ancient conversion. TheExpand
Honor and Shame
After establishing a definition of the honor and shame conceptual framework, this study goes on to examine the sense in which that framework can be said to characterize Mediterranean culture (pastExpand
One Form of Social Exchange or Two? “Euergetism,” Patronage, and Testament Studies
Researchers usually understand ancient Roman patronage and Greek “euegetism” as one and the same social exchange relationship, the difference being one of form rather of substance. In view of a briefExpand
Prayer
‘Prayer is nothing but an intimate sharing between friends’: so St Teresa of Avila describes the nature of Christian prayer from the perspective of the Western tradition of mystical theology. In thisExpand
Whose Faith/Loyalty in Revelation 2.13 and 14.12?
In Revelation 2.13 the phrase TlJV nLOTlV !lOU contains the genitive of the personal pronoun, !lOU, which can be used to express the object. In that case it is called an objective genitive. However,Expand
Herod: King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans
Herod: King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans, by Peter Richardson. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1996. Pp. xxvi + 360. $34.95. Peter Richardson's "biographical study" of Herod theExpand
Associations, Synagogues, and Congregations: Claiming a Place in Ancient Mediterranean Society
Ephesus, Galatia, Troas, and Pergamum are familiar names to readers of the New Testament. But what made this region such fertile ground for early synagogues and congregations of those who followedExpand
Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions, and Organizations Across Nations
The article reviews the book “Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviors, Institutions, and Organizations Across Nations,” Second Edition, by Geert Hofstede.
Name Change as an Indication of Religious Conversion in Antiquity
We take as our starting point the situation at Caesarea in Palestine in A.D. 308: the Persecution is perhaps at its most severe, headed up locally by the praeses, Firmillian. On trial before him areExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...